...my mind tamed into expressive illustrations for the sake of my sanity ❤

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(Source: boomxkat, via chrisbrownrca)


theautolife:

Synced.

(Source: sempeternal, via heellojoelle)

(Source: misterand, via uncoveredbutterfly)


luxxy-chan:

Meanwhile, at Bronycon

(Source: eroticfriendfictions, via leonacalif)


(Source: micollocim, via vorfreudde)


Rita Ora at MTV Movie Awards - 14/04 

Rita Ora at MTV Movie Awards - 14/04 

(Source: tudorroses, via tudorroses)

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via langleav)

Anonymous asked:

How about you start writing shorts again?

I try to take that route, but my imagination always has other plans. Even when I attempt to write a simple prompt. My mind pushes me to explore all the endless possibilities and I fall into the trap of feeling obligated to bring the entire vision to fruition. I swear expansion is becoming more of my enemy. And then at that point, the idea is so large that it’s too overwhelming to do at once, so I still end up without much progress. Or, when I’m actually being realistic, I deal with the frustration of cutting an idea completely or only doing a piece of it and keeping the rest to myself instead of sharing.

Hope that makes some sense. But in light of what I just mentioned, I’ve started on something yesterday that I’m attempting to stick with before going back to my initial stories. It’s a short, but more of a long prologue for my new CB fic. I’m hoping to have it done soon. 


Anonymous asked:

You mean a lot.


Anonymous asked:

I understand.. But soon you'll definitely be in a better position. Keep ya head up, love. (I had a mini debate on if I should say "ya" or "your" but it sounded better with "ya" in my head.. err.. if that makes any sense)

Ah! I have those same mental debates when I write lol. But thank you. It means a lot ❤️


Anonymous asked:

Surprise beautiful person! Once you get this, you should put it into at least 8 people’s asks (anonymously) who deserve it. If you break the chain, nothing bad will happen, but it is nice to know that someone thinks you’re beautiful inside and out. Help spread Anon love, not hate!

❤️


Anonymous asked:

What do you do when your falling out of love with your story? My story feels like a burden now. :( I wanna end it, but I feel like I owe it to my readers to give them an ending.

I’ve had this problem a few times. And sadly, I ended my stories, spelling out my reasons to my readers. Each time was different for me, but nonetheless the disappointing feeling got better over time.

I think in order to know what to do, you have some questions to answer: Can you handle disappointing your readers? Or would you feel better if you’re truly no longer anchored by a draining storyline? How far into the story are you? Have you planned it to the end and do you have a clear path to get there? Will it be a total loss if you stop now? Will it be disappointing for you to have an incomplete story in your archive? Do you have something better in store? Does writing the story stifle your growth and development?

In essence, only you can know if the decision is right or not. Pros vs cons. Sometimes you just need to be refreshed so working on something new while finishing the initial story could work. But sometimes you personally feel like there’s something else worth pouring your time into. Whatever you choose, be sure to consider yourself in the equation because you are the constant factor in the dilemma and the most important. As a writer, you come first. Hope this helps. :)